News

Monday, April 23, 2018

In April 2018, the right-wing One America News Network (OAN) interviewed California State Assembly member Travis Allen, who is running for governor as a Republican, about Assembly Bill 2943, a proposed law currently before state legislators.

The bill relates to “gay conversion therapy,” but according to Allen and “Tipping Point” host Liz Wheeler, it would effectively ban the sale of Christian books, including the Bible.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

A new bill passed by the California Assembly on Thursday would classify the selling or advertising of gay conversation therapy as a fraudulent business practice.

Assemblyman Evan Low (D) said the practice of trying to change someone’s sexual orientation is ineffective, The Associated Press reported.

Saturday, April 21, 2018

While a handful of states have moved to restrict so-called conversion therapy, California lawmakers are poised to ban the sale or advertisement of the controversial practice in an effort to crack down on its use. The California State Assembly passed a bill earlier this week that classifies conversion therapy as a fraudulent business practice and make it illegal for anyone to claim they can change a person's sexual orientation or gender identity through the practice. If passed by the state Senate, the bill would make California the first state to effectively ban conversion therapy from being performed on minors and adults.

Friday, April 20, 2018

California lawmakers are considering a bill that would make selling or advertising gay conversion therapy a violation of the state’s consumer fraud laws.

The state Assembly passed Bill 2943 on Thursday. The legislation, which targets the practice of trying to change a person’s sexual orientation, now heads to the state Senate. If enacted, the bill would make “advertising, offering to engage in, or engaging in sexual orientation change efforts” to the list of fraudulent business practices already banned in California.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Jennifer Antunez can’t vote in this country now and might never be able to. Nonetheless, the 16-year-old undocumented high school junior at San Diego’s King-Chavez High School spent last Sunday afternoon on a street corner helping others register to vote. “I’m not a U.S. citizen, so I can’t vote,” said Antunez, who was brought to this country from the Mexican city of Cuernavaca as a 6-year-old and is registered in the U.S. government’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA. “But I do know that every vote does count and that voting is a privilege — I want to help people do their civic duty.”

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Paul is in the studio with Assemblyman Evan Low/(D-San Jose) and Assemblywoman Marie Waldron/(R-Escondido) to talk about the introduction of legislation to combat the opioid crisis. The package of over a dozen bills will address the opioid epidemic by tightening prescription regulations, expanding access to alternative treatments, increasing prescriber training, and enhancing the tools available to health professionals and law enforcement.

Each day, the opioid crisis claims 91 American lives. On top of that, it is estimated that over two million Americans struggle with opioid addiction. In California, 1,925 people lost their lives from opioid overdoses in 2016. While the state as a whole has not been the hardest hit nationally, many rural California counties have some of the highest overdose rates in the country. For state and county overdose statistics, visit the California Opioid Overdose Surveillance Dashboard. 

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

California’s recreational marijuana customers would gain a measure of privacy under a new bill introduced at the state Capitol.

Assembly Bill 2402 would ban retail marijuana shops from selling customer data to third-party vendors without the customer’s consent.

Assemblyman Evan Low, D-Silicon Valley, said the bill would block employers from obtaining information about an employee who buys marijuana.

“The focus of this piece of legislation is around privacy,” Low said. “So, while now cannabis is legal in California, there are many individuals who want to make sure that cannabis and their use of cannabis is not made public for many reasons.”

Similar restrictions are already in place for medical marijuana customers.