KTXL: Legislation to Combat Opioid Crisis

Paul is in the studio with Assemblyman Evan Low/(D-San Jose) and Assemblywoman Marie Waldron/(R-Escondido) to talk about the introduction of legislation to combat the opioid crisis. The package of over a dozen bills will address the opioid epidemic by tightening prescription regulations, expanding access to alternative treatments, increasing prescriber training, and enhancing the tools available to health professionals and law enforcement.

Capital Public Radio: Bill Would Boost Privacy For California Marijuana Customers

California’s recreational marijuana customers would gain a measure of privacy under a new bill introduced at the state Capitol.

Assembly Bill 2402 would ban retail marijuana shops from selling customer data to third-party vendors without the customer’s consent.

Assemblyman Evan Low, D-Silicon Valley, said the bill would block employers from obtaining information about an employee who buys marijuana.

KOVR: California Lawmaker Wants Lifetime Gun Ban For People With Mental Illness

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — Newtown, San Bernardino, Las Vegas, Sutherland Springs and now Parkland.

Five of the six deadliest mass shootings of the past six years in the United States were all carried out by a gunman wielding an AR-15-style semiautomatic rifle.

Now California is stepping in with revived gun legislation targeting people with mental health illnesses.

Assemblyman Evan Low has sponsored a bill that says a person with a documented mental illness will be banned from owning a firearm for life.

Sacramento Bee: California must protect its video game industry

Each day, more than 150 million Americans turn to video games to be entertained, to learn a skill or to spend time with family and friends. Without realizing it, they’re also providing a major boost to California’s economy.

Given our dominant positions in both entertainment and technology, it’s not surprising that California is far ahead of other states when it comes to the entertainment software industry. California is home to 27 percent of the domestic gaming industry, with more than 900 companies and 33,000 jobs – seven times as many as our nearest competitor, Texas.